Kentucky

Kentucky: Lawmakers Advance Marijuana-Derived CBD Oil Bill

CBDOilForAutismAndEpilepsy

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A bill which would legalize the use of marijuana-derived cannabidiol (CBD) oil to treat seizures associated with severe forms of childhood epilepsy, unanimously passed a key committee in the Kentucky Legislature on Wednesday.

Senate Bill 124, which passed the Kentucky Senate last week, would allow children with severe seizures to be treated with CBD oil, a non-psychoactive marijuana extract, reports Mollie Reilly at The Huffington Post. Under the language of the measure, patients would be treated as part of FDA trials (which of course could introduce long bureaucratic delays into the process) or under the recommendation of state research hospitals.

The measure cleared the Kentucky House Judiciary Committee on a unanimous vote during Wednesday's hearing.

Rita Wooton, who said her four-year-old son Eli suffers from up to 40 seizures a day, was moved to tears by the bill's advancement. "When I started this roller coaster ride two months ago, I never thought this would be feasible for any of us," Wooton said, reports Theo Keiteh at WAVE. "We're just really super excited that this is coming here -- soon."

The bill now goes to the full House, where Democratic Speaker Greg Stumbo said it should have easy sailing.

Kentucky: Senate Unanimously Passes CBD Cannabis Oil Bill

KentuckyStateSenatorJulieDenton

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

For the first time in history, the Kentucky Senate on Wednesday unanimously approved a bill which would legalize the medical use of marijuana-derived CBD oil.

The oil, which is useful in controlling seizures, including those among children with uncontrollable epilepsy, is extracted from the cannabis plant. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is not psychoactive, unlike tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which is responsible for the "high" from marijuana.

Senate Bill 124, sponsored by Sen. Julie Denton (R-Louisville) would allow the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville medical schools to conduct research and allow anyone enrolled in a U.S. FDA trial to be treated with CBD oil, reports Gregory A. Hall at the Louisville Courier-Journal.

"This is not a partisan issue; it's a people issue," Sen. Denton said, reports Theo Keith at WAVE3 News. "During the session, there's been a lot of education going on."

Kentucky: Medical Marijuana Bill Approved By House Health and Welfare Committee

KentuckyTheBluegrassState

HB 350, the Cannabis Compassion Act, would allow people with debilitating medical conditions to access and use medical marijuana without fear of arrest

The Kentucky House Health and Welfare Committee on Thursday approved a bill that would allow people suffering from conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), and HIV/AIDS to use medical marijuana by a vote of 9-5, following a public hearing.

The Cannabis Compassion Act, or HB 350, introduced by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian (D-Louisville) and co-sponsored by Committee Chairman Tom Burch (D-Louisville), would permit licensed patients and caregivers to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana, and it would establish regulations to operate a limited number of medical marijuana compassion centers and testing facilities.

This is the first time an effective medical marijuana bill has passed a committee in the Kentucky Legislature. A similar bill, SB 43, was introduced in the Senate earlier this year by Sen. Perry Clark (D-Louisville).

“Patients suffering from a wide range of medical conditions are grateful to have earned this committee’s support on HB 350,” said Matt Simon, legislative analyst for the Marijuana Policy Project. “Chairman Burch and his committee have taken a stand in favor of protecting seriously ill Kentuckians, and they should be applauded for doing so.”

Kentucky: House Committee to Hold Public Hearing on Medical Marijuana Bill on Thursday

KentuckyMarijuana

HB 350, the Cannabis Compassion Act, would allow people with debilitating medical conditions to access and use medical marijuana without fear of arrest

Thursday - high noon - at the Capitol! The Kentucky House Health and Welfare Committee is scheduled to hold a public hearing Thursday, February 27, at 12 noon ET on a bill that would allow people suffering from conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), and HIV/AIDS to use medical marijuana if their doctors recommend it. The hearing will be held in Room 169 of the Kentucky Capitol Annex Building.

HB 350, known as the Cannabis Compassion Act, introduced on February 10 by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian (D-Louisville), a registered nurse, is the first effective medical marijuana bill ever introduced in the Kentucky House of Representatives. It would allow licensed patients and caregivers to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana.

It would also establish safety compliance facilities and permit one medical marijuana compassion center for every 100,000 state residents. Sen. Perry Clark (D-Louisville) introduced a similar measure, SB 43, earlier this year.

Kentucky: Medical Marijuana Hearing Postponed, Rescheduled For February 27

KentuckiansForMedicinalMarijuana

The Kentucky House Health and Welfare Committee has postponed a public hearing on a bill that would allow patients suffering from conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and HIV/AIDS top use medical marijuana if their doctors recommend it.

The hearing on HB 350, the Cannabis Compassion Act, originally scheduled for Thursday, is now rescheduled for February 27.

HB 350, known as the Cannabis Compassion Act, introduced on February 10 by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian (D-Louisville), a registered nurse, was the first effective medical marijuana bill ever introduced in the Kentucky House of Representatives. It would allow licensed patients and caregivers to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana.

It would also establish safety compliance facilities and permit one medical marijuana compassion center for every 100,000 state residents. Sen. Perry Clark (D-Louisville) introduced a similar measure, SB 43, earlier this year.

“The science is clear that medical marijuana can provide significant benefits to people suffering from a variety of debilitating conditions,” said Matt Simon, a legislative analyst for the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP). “If physicians think their patients would benefit from medical marijuana, politicians should not interfere. Kentuckians do not want seriously ill people to be treated like criminals for trying to improve the quality of their lives.”

Kentucky: House Committee to Hold Public Hearing on Medical Marijuana Bill on Thursday

KentuckyMarijuana

HB 350, the Cannabis Compassion Act, would allow people with debilitating medical conditions to access and use medical marijuana without fear of arrest

The Kentucky House Health and Welfare Committee is scheduled to hold a public hearing on Thursday at 12 noon ET on a bill that would allow people suffering from conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), and HIV/AIDS to use medical marijuana if their doctors recommend it. The hearing will be held in Room 169 of the Kentucky Capitol Annex Building.

HB 350, known as the Cannabis Compassion Act, introduced on February 10 by Rep. Mary Lou Marzian (D-Louisville), a registered nurse, was the first effective medical marijuana bill ever introduced in the Kentucky House of Representatives. It would allow licensed patients and caregivers to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana.

It would also establish safety compliance facilities and permit one medical marijuana compassion center for every 100,000 state residents. Sen. Perry Clark (D-Louisville) introduced a similar measure, SB 43, earlier this year.

Kentucky: Poll Shows 52% Favor Medical Marijuana

FreeTheWeedKentucky

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Kentucky residents favor medical marijuana by a margin of 15 percentage points, according to a new WHAS11/Courier-Journal Bluegrass Poll released on Sunday night. According to the poll, 52 percent favor allowing the use of medical marijuana in Kentucky, while 37 percent oppose it and 12 percent are not sure.

Senator Perry Clark (D-Louisville) sponsors Senate Bill 43, which would legalize the medicinal use of cannabis in Kentucky, as has been done in 20 other states, reports Joe Arnold at WHAS11. "The science is far on our side," Clark said. "Cannabis is medicine. It's medicine in its many forms."

Predictably, law enforcement opposes the bill, claiming it would be easy to abuse.

"It's very difficult to regulate," claimed Kentucky State Police Commissioner Rodney Brewer. "The laws are vague. They're not well thought out. So, there's a host of issues that go with it aside from it not being proven."

"You have of lot of testimony on both sides of folks saying it makes me feel better or doesn't," Brewer claimed, ignoring the fact that nobody's saying it doesn't. "But in the end, there's never been any scientific evidence that this is a viable medicine for out illnesses," he lied, ignoring thousands of scientific studies which show exactly that.

Kentucky: Medical Marijuana Bill Introduced In House

MedicalMarijuanaLeafDrawing

Legislation would allow people with debilitating medical conditions to access and use medical marijuana without fear of arrest

Similar bill already introduced in Senate

A bill that would allow seriously ill Kentuckians to use medical marijuana with a doctor’s recommendation was introduced in the House of Representatives last week. The “Cannabis Compassion Act,” or HB 350, was introduced by long-time lawmaker and registered nurse Rep. Mary Lou Marzian (D-Louisville). It is very similar to SB 43, which was introduced in the Senate by Sen. Perry Clark (D-Louisville) earlier this year.

The bill is the first effective medical marijuana bill ever to be introduced in the Kentucky House of Representatives. HB 350 would allow patients suffering from cancer, multiple sclerosis (MS), HIV/AIDS, and other serious conditions to use medical marijuana with a recommendation from their doctor.

Patients and caregivers would be able to possess up to three ounces at a time and grow up to 12 plants per patient. The bill would also establish safety compliance facilities and would permit one medical marijuana compassion center for every 100,000 residents to ensure safe and reliable access for patients.

U.S.: Farm Bill Allows States And Universities To Grow Hemp For Research

IndustrialHempField

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Hemp cultivation for research purposes by colleges, universities and state agriculture departments is allowed in the new Farm Bill, according to a report released Monday night by the U.S. Senate and House conference committee on the bill.

The hemp amendment in the Farm Bill was written by U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon), U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Kentucky), and U.S. Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colorado), reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian. All three Congressmen represent states where industrial hemp production is already legal under state law.

The inclusion of the industrial hemp amendment in the Farm Bill is a "bright spot in an otherwise disappointing bill," Rep. Blumenauer said late on Monday. The bill, which cuts about $8 billion from the food stamp program over the next decade, is expected to be voted on by the U.S. House and Senate on Wednesday.

"Oregonians have made it clear that they believe industrial hemp should be treated as an agricultural commodity, not a drug," Blumenauer said in an email to The Oregonian. "By including language easing restrictions on industrial hemp in states where it is legal, Congress sends an important message that we are ready to examine hemp in a more appropriate way."

The amendment allows colleges, universities and state agriculture programs to cultivate hemp for research and pilot projects; it does not, however, protect individual farmers who grow the crop.

Kentucky: Lawmaker Says Cannabis Oil More Likely To Get Support

KentuckyStateSenatorJulieDenton

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A Republican state senator in Kentucky on Wednesday said that state lawmakers should look at whether oil extracts from marijuana can provide medicinal benefits.

Measures to legalize cannabis oil stand a much better chance of passing the Legislature than bills to legalize medical marijuana as a plant, said Sen. Julie Denton (R-Loiuisville), who chairs the Senate Health and Welfare Committee, reports Mike Wynn at The Courier-Journal.

"People need to get comfortable with something that they don't feel threatened by, that they can understand and that they can support rather than going from 0 to 60 all in one fell swoop," she said. (I would suggest to Sen. Denton that her job is to educate her constituents, rather than dumb-down legislation so as not to alarm them.)

The committee heard nearly an hour's worth of testimony from advocates who said the cannabis plant (and its oils) can treat medical conditions ranging from epilepsy to diabetes.

Sen. Denton said that cannabis oil is more likely to win support in this year's session because of its low levels of THC, the primary psychoactive component in marijuana. (She has evidently heard about CBD oil, and has incorrectly assumed that all cannabis oil is CBD oil, but of course there is also THC oil and full-extract oil which contains all the cannabinoids).

Kentucky: State Senator Pushes For Medical Marijuana Legalization

FreeTheWeedKentucky

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A state senator in Kentucky is ready to introduce a bill which would legalize medical marijuana in the Bluegrass State.

"You ask yourself a question, 'Is cannabis medicine?' Yes or no are the only two answers, and the answer is yes," said Kentucky state Senator Perry Clark, reports Kelly Davis at WDRB.

Senator Clark has introduced a medical marijuana bill twice before in the Kentucky Legislature; he's hoping the third time's the charm.

"We are moving in the correct direction; we have a lot of people who were adamantly opposed to us three years ago that have seen a lot of evidence," Clark, a Democrat from Louisville, said.

Jaime Montalvo, who has multiple sclerosis, was arrested in 2011 for growing cannabis, but said he's not a criminal, and that he uses it to control pain.

"I never really feared the prosecution up until the time it happened," Montalvo said. "It helped muscle spasms; it helped me sleep."

WDRB 41 Louisville News

Kentucky: GOP Lawmaker Offers To 'Fill Committee Room' With People Affected By Marijuana Deaths

RepRobertBenvenuti(KY)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Will somebody please drag Kentucky Rep. Robert Benvenuti into the 21st Century? The Republican lawmaker, in a hearing on legalizing medical marijuana in his state, said the risks of pot are too high, and offered to "fill this committee room" with "parents of dead children based on the effects of marijuana."

Rep. Benvenuti's acute case of Reefer Madness brought some unintentional comedy to the proceedings, but it would be a lot funnier if this clown weren't in a position of power, denying life-saving medical treatments to patients with terminal and debilitating illnesses.

The fact-challenged legislator cited Kentucky's high rates of illegal and prescription drug abuse as reasons why it would be too dangerous to legalize medical marijuana in the Bluegrass State.

"I do not believe in the recreational use of marijuana," Benvenuti said, "and I could likewise fill this committee room with first responders, law enforcement officers and parents of dead children based on the effects of marijuana."

The assembled crowd was having trouble believing that a public official could make such an outlandish statement in a legislative hearing. As a protest started to spontaneously erupt from the crowd that marijuana is not a deadly substance, Rep. Benvenuti forged ahead.

"In driving intoxicated, in child abuse, we've already heard today from folks who talk about intoxicants and its role in child fatality and child abuse," he said. "So we need no more recreational drugs in Kentucky."

Kentucky: Agriculture Commissioner To Pitch Hemp To Auto Executives

KentuckyAgricultureCommissionerJamesComer

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer is taking his pitch for industrial hemp to auto manufacturers on Thursday.

Comer is attending AutoConnect, a trade conference in Nashville, where executives from Toyota, Volkswagen, Nissan, Honda and other manufacturers will be attending, reports Janet Patton of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

The commissioner of agriculture hopes to tell the execs about using hemp, which he said contains "longer, stronger, lighter and greener" fibers than the products currently used in the auto manufacturing process.

"It has been my goal to make the pitch for Kentucky-grown industrial hemp to automobile manufacturers," Comer said. "Now the opportunity is here and I believe this could be a win-win: a win for Kentucky farmers and a win for an industry working hard to find a more environmentally sound manufacturing process."

Some automakers in Europe are already using hemp as a biodegradable, sustainable material in parts such as dashboards, interior panels, and soundproofing.

Comer said Kentucky farmers might plant hemp next year despite an advisory letter issued last month by state Attorney General Jack Conway saying that farmers who do so "will expose themselves to potential criminal liability and the possible seizure of property by federal or state law enforcement agencies."

Kentucky: Hemp Production Moves Closer To Reality

Hemp=Jobs

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Staff members have been instructed to begin the process of writing rules for the development of the long-banned industrial hemp crop in Kentucky, according to a news release from the state Department of Agriculture.

The state's industrial hemp commission is calling on GOP Agriculture Commissioner James Comer and Republican U.S. Senator Rand Paul to write a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice to "make Kentucky's intentions known," reports Jonathan Meador at WFPL.

Paul and Comer are hoping for clarity from the feds on the current legality of growing a hemp crop in Kentucky. The issue remains murky in the wake of a a DOJ memo released last month by Deputy Attorney General James Cole. According to that August 30 memo, the federal government "will respect" state marijuana laws, which advocates believe includes the legalization of industrial hemp production.

Sen. Paul intends "to be a part of correspondence with the Department of Justice," according to a spokesperson, and he "supports the work of the Hemp Commission and supports Commissioner Comer's efforts to move forward with the reintroduction of industrial hemp in Kentucky."

Kentucky: Hemp Farming Can Move Ahead Under New DOJ Policy, Ag Commissioner Says

HempHarvest2010

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said on Friday this week's policy change by the U.S. Department of Justice, under which the DOJ agreed to defer any lawsuits against states which legalize recreational marijuana, also clears the way for farmers to begin growing industrial hemp in the Bluegrass State.

The DOJ announced the new policy on Thursday, allowing states to legalize and regulate the cultivation, sales and use of marijuana as long as the changes protect children and prevent cannabis from entering the black market, reports the Courier-Journal.

Comer called the federal policy reversal a "major victory" for Kentucky farmers; he had spearheaded a hemp bill through this year's session of the Legislature. Officials indicated hemp cultivation could begin within a year.

Hemp, like marijuana, is a variety of the cannabis plant, but industrial hemp is grown for the fiber in its stalks and for the nutritional oil in its seeds, which contain a favorable ratio of the essential fatty acids (EFAs), Omega 3-6-9. Federal law, however, treats hemp the same as marijuana.

"It's about time," Comer said. "Two years ago, the Obama administration would not even discuss the legalization of industrial hemp. But through a bipartisan coalition of Kentucky leaders, we forced their hand."

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