Hemp News, a compilation of international news stories about hemp and cannabis, is a public service of Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) and THCF Medical Clinics. All material included herein is provided free of charge for political and educational purposes under the US federal "Fair Use Doctrine". This material may only be used for political and educational purposes without express written consent.


Colorado: Sipp Industries Enters Cannabis Space With Plasma Lighting Sale

SippIndustriesPlasmaLighting

SIPP Industries, Inc., a conglomerate corporation that specializes in technology, import and export of commercial and consumer products, on Tuesday announced the initial sale of Sipp's Advanced Plasma Lighting (APL) to a strategic partner located in Colorado involved with the commercial development of cannabis grow operations.

"This initial order will be evaluated by our partner in the Colorado market to determine potential and feasibility for larger scale deployment in excess of 100 Sipp lights over the next 6-12 months," said Sipp CEO Syman Vong. "It is our mission to be the leader in consulting large scale commercial grow operations seeking higher efficiency lighting solutions with a focus on key recreational markets such as Colorado.

"Advanced Plasma Lighting is still in its infancy and we are taking a consultative approach to larger scale engagements that wish to test Sipp APL technology for proof of concept and beyond," Vong said.

In comparison to other grow lighting systems plasma can save up to 50 percent in energy consumption while significantly decreasing or eliminating the need for costly ventilation systems. More importantly, plasma lighting is the only technology that provides the fullest spectrum available which enhances the quality of the grow operation from vegetation to flowering stages compared with HID, HPS, and LED lighting systems, according to Sipp Industries.

U.K.: Queen's Speech Lays Out Plans To Outlaw Legal Highs

AngelusFoundation(logo)

A United Kingdom charity dedicated to raising awareness of the risks from "legal highs" on Wednesday welcomed government plans to legislate against their sale.

The charity, Angelus, has led the call for a strong legal response to the easy availability of these legal substances and has long campaigned for fundamental measures to disrupt the supply of these legal drugs. Angelus described the need to combine the legislation with better public awareness of these harmful substances as "vital."

The legal change, announced in Wednesday's Queen's Speech, should effectively shut down the high street trade in "legal highs," according to Angelus. Angelus surveys have shown 13.6 percent of 14-18 year old school students and 19 percent of University Freshers had tried one.

Angelus advocates a greater commitment from central and local government, schools and universities, to giving the education which young people need to stay safe from these substances.

"Angelus has been campaigning long and loud for some regulation on the open sale of 'legal highs,'" said Jan King, chief executive of Angelus. "It has been like the Wild West until now, with young people able to access these dangerous products virtually without restriction.

"So, naturally, we are pleased the new Government has made this issue an early priority," King said. "Our Founder, Maryon Stewart, deserves enormous credit for being the driving force behind Angelus and in getting this issue into the national conversation.

Washington: Seattle Mayor Plans Crackdown On Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

EdMurraySeattleMayor[TheSeattleTimes]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Apparently not content to wait for the scheduled extinction date of medical marijuana dispensaries in Washington -- set for July 1, 2016 -- Seattle Mayor Ed Murray on Tuesday proposed legislation that could shut down dozens of dispensaries in the city.

Mayor Murray's plan would create a new business license specifically for medical marijuana dispensaries and create enforcement priorities for unlicensed shops, reports Evan Bush at The Seattle Times.

The plan follows the Washington Legislature's attempts to "fold" medical marijuana into the state's recreational cannabis system established under I-502 and SB 5052. The latter law, approved last month, calls for the Washington State Liquor Control Board (which will be renamed the Liquor and Cannabis Board) to "assess the merit" of medical marijuana dispensaries are license those which qualify by July 2016.

The LCB still hasn't come up with the rules for grading medical marijuana dispensaries, and many observers believe the ultimate goal isn't to license the businesses anyway, but rather to shut almost all of them down. It's not yet clear how many additional licenses Seattle might get, or which businesses could get those licenses.

South Dakota: Medical Marijuana Ballot Drive To Begin

SouthDakotansForSafeAccess(USE)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A South Dakota medical marijuana activist said she hopes to begin gathering signatures within a month to put a medical marijuana proposal on the 2016 ballot.

Melissa Mentele, 38, said on Tuesday that her ballot measure language is currently under review at the South Dakota Attorney General's office, reports James Nord at the Associated Press.

People with conditions such as cancer could be helped by cannabis, according to medical marijuana proponents. Mentele herself suffers from reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

Mentele said she's taking the ballot proposal route because state legislators haven't been willing to enact a medical marijuana program. Her proposal would allow patients with a doctor's authorization to buy or grow cannabis, and to possess up to three dried ounces.

"We're trying to bring compassionate access onto the ballot, because that's what we need in South Dakota," Mentele said. "If somebody doesn't fight to change the law, it's going to stay a bad law."

Two previous attempts to legalize medical marijuana have fallen short in South Dakota. A 2006 effort got 47.7 percent of the vote, but a 2010 attempt got just 36.7 percent.

Other organizers are sponsoring 2016 ballot initiatives that would prohibit the sale and transfer of alcohol and tobacco in South Dakota. It's "about consistency" in the law, according to marijuana activist Bob Newland, 67.

Michigan: Marijuana Legalization Group Withdraws Petition, Will Resubmit

MichiganMarijuanaLeaf(WheresWeed)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The organizers behind a marijuana legalization drive in Michigan on Tuesday withdrew their petition, saying they plan to submit new language later.

The Michigan Cannabis Coalition told the Michigan Board of State Canvassers of the move on Tuesday, reports the Associated Press. The group had been expected to have its petition approved by the board.

The legislation would require 252,000 valid voter signatures before going to the GOP-led Michigan Legislature. If lawmakers took no action or rejected the bill, it would go before the voters in November 2016.

Several anonymous people from the agricultural, real estate, insurance and education sectors are backing the bill through the Michigan Cannabis Coalition. The state could add jobs and tax revenue by legalizing and regulating cannabis for recreational purposes, according to the group.

Michigan already allows marijuana for medicinal purposes.

Louisiana: Senate Approves Bill To Reform Draconian Marijuana Possession Law

LouisianaCannabis

New Law Would Be Important Step Toward Reducing Louisiana’s Notoriously Overcrowded Prisons and Jails

Bill Now Heads to the House

Louisiana’s Senate on Monday took an important step toward reforming their state’s harsh marijuana possession law when they approved bill SB 241 by a vote of 27-12. If passed, Louisiana would join the growing number of states that have recently reduced penalties for small amounts of marijuana.

“This is a long-sought opportunity to take a more compassionate and commonsense approach to marijuana,” said Yolande Cadore, director of strategic partnerships at the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). “Louisiana's overdue for a major overhaul of its drug policies and this is a good first step."

The U.S. has the highest incarceration rate of any country in the world – and Louisiana has the highest rate in the U.S. Louisiana’s incarceration rate has doubled in the last twenty years and is nearly five times higher than Iran's, 13 times higher than China's and 20 times higher than Germany's. One of the key drivers of Louisiana’s world-leading incarceration rate is the war on drugs – 18,000 Louisiana residents are arrested for drug law violations each year.

U.S.: Stashlogix Helps Keep Cannabis Secure For Families

StashlogixContainers

With marijuana legal in more and more states, one issue that arises repeatedly is child safety.

Stashlogix wants to help keep marijuana where it belongs — in the hands of responsible adults.

With an integrated combination lock and strong odor barriers, Stashlogix says its container prevents kids from stumbling across a cannabis-infused hard candy that Dad uses to ease his back pain, or to stop a teenager from not only finding the stash of Maui Waui, but smoking it.

This simple solution to a serious problem pulls it off in style, too. These are not bags emblazoned with pot leaves and Rastafarian colors. Instead, Stashlogix line of three containers look more like cases for high-end camera equipment, or smartphone accessories.

“As a family man, I hunted for a container that could hold cannabis products discretely, and that would stop my kids from ever gaining access to it,” said Stashlogix founder Skip Stone. “But I could not find anything that was lightweight, lockable and portable.

"Most of the products were heavy boxes," Stone said. "The others were gaudy with nods and winks to stoner culture. Neither of these options appealed to me. So I designed Stashlogix.”

South Carolina: Mom Legally Making, Selling Medical Marijuana CBD Extract

PalmettoSynergisticResearch

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A mother in South Carolina is manufacturing cannabis oil, legally. The oil is high in cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive but medicinal component of marijuana that is now legal in the state under S. 839, which allows for consumable hemp products with less than .3 percent of THC.

"I'm building my company here," said Janel Ralph, reports Molly Grantham at WISTV.com. "I think it'll be up and running in maybe six months. But I'm an optimist. I guess I can't say exactly on the timeline."

Janel's company, Palmetto Synergistic Research, will specialize in CBD oil.

Because of the controversy surrounding marijuana, Ralph is keeping her location secret.

"There will be people who would intentionally try to steal it not knowing that it's hemp," she said. "Criminals could hear I'm manufacturing medical marijuana and think they could take it.

"They wouldn't understand that what I'm making has such a low THC, that even if they took they plants they couldn't smoke it or sell it as marijuana," she said. "You can't get high on what I'm making."

Ralph started it all last year because of her five-year-old daughter, Harmony, who has a genetic condition called lissencephaly. Harmony's brain is missing one of her chromosomes, and she has lots of seizures. Multiple pharmaceuticals didn't work.

Missouri: Man Given Life Sentence For Marijuana Has Sentence Commuted

JeffMizanskeyLifeForPot

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Twenty-two years after being arrested for marijuana -- and 19 years after being sentenced to life in prison for it -- Jeff Mizanskey on Friday had his sentenced commuted by Missouri Governor Jay Nixon.

Mizanskey, 62, was the only man in Missouri prisons serving life for pot, report Kevin S. Held and Anthony Kiekow at Fox 2 Now. He was arrested during an undercover drug operation in Sedalia, Missouri, in 1993, and was sentenced in 1996 under the state's Prior and Persistent Drug Offender Law, which is a three-strike, habitual offender system.

"The executive power to grant clemency is one I take with a great deal of consideration and seriousness," Nixon said in a press release announcing the commutation of Mizanskey's sentence, reports Danny Wicentowski at Riverfront Times. Nixon also pardoned five other nonviolent offenders.

"It's wonderful," said Michael Mizanskey, Jeff's brother. "Thank Jay Nixon for doing that, for finally looking at his case and doing the right thing.

"I'm very emotional," Michael said. "I've overjoyed he has a chance. In almost 22 years he had two write-ups, one for putting mail in the wrong slot and one for a messy floor. No fights, no nothing. Tell me that's not a model prisoner."

Michigan: Lawmaker Wants To Legalize, Tax Marijuana To Pay For Roads

BrandonDillon,MichiganStateRepresentative(D-GrandRapids)[MLive.com]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Michigan state Rep. Brandon Dillon (D-Grand Rapids) on Wednesday said he supports legalizing and taxing marijuana, and using the proceeds for state road repairs and other funding issues.

Dillon said legalization will not only benefit the state by bringing in more funds, but will also give law enforcement more time to concentrate their efforts on violence and property crime, reports Fox 17 News.

In states like Colorado, where cannabis is already legalized, violent crime has fallen 6.9 percent, according to Dillon. He also pointed to several cities across Michigan, including his hometown of Grand Rapids, which have recently voted to decriminalize pot.

"We know that attitudes are quickly changing," Dillon wrote in a May 19 guest editorial on MLive.com. "Recent surveys show that more than half of Michigan residents are in favor of legalizing, regulating and taxing the adult use of marijuana."

While legalization won't be a panacea for all of Michigan's challenges, "However, taking marijuana off the black market will generate much needed revenue, allow us to redeploy law enforcement resources to focus on violent and property crime, and ease the tax burden on the middle class," Dillon wrote.

"Our current marijuana laws are broken," Dillon wrote. "It is time to fix them."

Maryland: Governor Vetoes Popular Bill Intended To Fix Marijuana Decrim Law

LarryHogan(GovernorMaryland)[KatherineFrey-TheWashingtonPost]

Marijuana Policy Coalition of Maryland calls on state lawmakers to override veto of SB 517, which would remove criminal penalties for possession of marijuana paraphernalia

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) announced late Friday afternoon that he has vetoed a widely supported bill to remove criminal penalties for possession of marijuana paraphernalia, including potential jail time.

SB 517, introduced by Sen. Bobby Zirkin (D-Baltimore County), was approved 32-13 in the Senate and 83-53 in the House of Delegates. The measure would also have designated public marijuana consumption a civil offense punishable by a $500 fine.

Maryland adopted a law last year that decriminalized possession of a small amount of marijuana, but it did not include marijuana paraphernalia. That leaves the state in the unusual position of having decriminalized marijuana itself, but marijuana paraphernalia is still a crime.

Gov. Hogan’s letter to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller announcing the veto and explaining his reasoning is available at http://bit.ly/1ellF1e.

Ohio: Attorney General Looking At Drafting His Own Medical Marijuana Proposal

MikeDeWineAmericanFlag[USElectionAtlas]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Things are getting crazy in Ohio. One recreational marijuana legalization proposal, which appears headed for the ballot, would hand over control of all growing in the state to just 10 companies. And now Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has said he has staff looking into a medical marijuana proposal which they'd draft themselves.

The proposal would be "very limited" and "tightly controlled," DeWine told Alan Johnson at The Columbus Dispatch. A Republican who opposes recreational cannabis legalization, DeWine wouldn't commit to saying he supports legalizing medical marijuana.

But the Attorney General did grant that there are people who definitely could use it; he said he's having his staff work up a proposal before consulting with state lawmakers.

Staffers are reviewing medical marijuana systems in other states to see if it's possible to set up rules that can't be exploited by recreational pot users, DeWine spokesman Dan Tierney said on Friday, reports Jeremy Pelzer of the Northeast Ohio Media Group. Specifically, Tierney said staffers are investigating methods of administration such as ointments or pills, which don't involve smoking.

Tierney said it's still "far too early" to say if or when DeWine will take such a step. The Attorney General still has "grave concerns" about full marijuana legalization, according to Tierney.

New York: Roger Daltrey Threatens To Cancel The Who Concert Due To Pot Smoke

RogerDaltrey[WBAB]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Who's Roger Daltrey on Wednesday night threatened to cancel a concert at Nassau Coliseum, saying he'd walk off stage if someone smoking marijuana near the stage didn't stop.

Daltrey claims he has an allergy to cannabis smoke that affects his throat and singing voice, a condition the band emphasized during the informational slides it projected before the show, reports Glenn Gamboa at Newsday.

Daltrey ultimately confronted the audience member who was toking up; the fan seems to have obliged and the show continued as planned.

"Over the course of The Who's 50 years as a band, you'd think frontman Roger Daltrey would have built up a tolerance to cannabis smoke," wrote Philip Cosores at Radio.com.

"After all, he has performed in weed-filled halls throughout the stony '60s up to present day when weed is practically legal," Cosores wrote. "It is surprising to hear that the singer is not so accommodating to people that want to get high while they watch his band."

A fan video which surfaced shows guitarist Pete Townshend suggesting that a pot smoker stick it in his rear, saying "it is the quickest way!"

Photo of Roger Daltrey: WBAB

Maine: Judge Denies Marijuana Defendant's Request To Visit Dying Dad

MalcolmFrench[KevinBennett-BangorDailyNews]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A federal judge on Tuesday denied a request from a man convicted for cultivating marijuana to visit his dying father. Ironically, the denial came 10 days after the father had died.

U.S. District Judge John Woodcock ruled that Malcolm French, 53, was a flight risk because of his estimated worth of $14 million and the long prison sentence (between 20 and 24 years) that he's facing, reports Judy Harrison at the Bangor Daily News.

"The court appreciates Mr. French's desire to physically see and speak with his father and it regrets having to reject Mr. French's request," Judge Woodcock ruled.

French, of Enfield, Maine; Rodney Russell, 51, of South Thomaston; and Kendall Chase, 58, of Bradford were found guilty of a number of charges in the Township 37 marijuana plantation case on January 24, 20-14, after a 10-day jury trial.

All have remained behind bars while awaiting sentencing. Dates for their sentencings have not yet been set. Judge Woodcock said in his most recent ruling that French, who is being held at the Piscataquis County Jail, would most likely be sentenced in late June.

Last month, Judge Woodcock had denied the defendants' joint motion for a new trial, reports Johanna S. Billings at the Bangor Daily News.

U.S.: Filmmaker Seeks To Show America The Truth About Cannabis

MichaelHopePot(themovie)

A cannabis documentary called Pot (the movie) recently had its world premiere at the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Film Festival. The film is unlike any other on the subject, covering the most common misconceptions and under communicated aspects of marijuana. While the medical side is slowly becoming better understood, the movie also brings to light the public health aspect of the recreational side, presenting cannabis as safer than alcohol.

Michael Hope is an artist, musician and the independent filmmaker behind Pot (the movie). He is on a grassroots mission to educate the public and inspire change when it comes to the perception and legislation of cannabis.

“For the last 90 years or so, there has been a huge misinformation campaign against marijuana,” said Hope. “There are people struggling with disease and disabilities who could benefit from legislative changes related to cannabis use.”

Hope’s goal is to deliver widespread viewing of his movie, which advocates for pragmatic laws for recreational and medicinal use while introducing people to some of the exciting science about cannabis in a digestible and entertaining way. Through a crowdfunding campaign themed “Hope for Liberty and Justice,” he plans to raise $150,000 to help promote the film and make it as accessible as possible with a town-hall style tour offering low or no-cost screenings.

“I firmly believe that once people are informed and understand the benefits, they will stand up and support this movement,” said Hope. “People will care if we educate them.”

Syndicate content